Horses Teach at Med School?

That sounds like one of those tabloid headlines designed to draw your attention because it is so nonsensical. But at Rutgers medical school that is indeed what is happening! Horses are teaching at Med School! It’s “a doctor’s presence alone, rather than their competence, that can mean the difference between life or death.”  Maria Katsamanis,[…]

The Science of Team Building

“Yet if we look at our evolutionary history, we can see that language is a relatively recent development and was most likely layered upon older signals that communicated dominance, interest, and emotions among humans. Today these ancient patterns of communication still shape how we make decisions and coordinate work among ourselves.” I just read a[…]

Conscious Communication

  I’ve been thinking about conscious communication a lot these days. It’s a complex topic that doesn’t get enough attention. Usually it gets attention when it’s a problem and then frequently that problem appears to be an insoluble one. Non-verbal communication incorporates everything from bad breath and taking personal space to an inexplicable feeling of[…]

Privileged Communication

Harold and EvelynLately in conversation with horsewomen I have heard many say they got involved in equine activities because they were “called” by the horses. It struck me that this is not a common description of how one becomes involved in a sport or recreational activity, or even, for that matter, in a career. Linda Kohanov, author of The Tao of Equus and an innovator in the evolution of horse human relationships, speaks powerfully of being called and the profound change that occurred in her life – because she listened.

I was drawn to horses slowly and almost by accident. I always loved horses and did the occasional trail ride in my youth. It wasn’t until I read The Horse Whisperer in 1998 and discovered what I had imagined in childhood was true: the violence humans did and do to horses in the name of training, the so-called “breaking” of horses, was unnecessary and was indeed bullying at best, at worst it was sadistic. […]